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Author Topic: chinese identification  (Read 257 times)

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #12 on: Jan 31, 2021, 01:11:03 »
thanks peterp

for your time

cordialy

joseph

peterp

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #11 on: Jan 30, 2021, 12:31:13 »
Bought in the 1980s? Then this is even more unlikely this is a fake, because the massive faking that is going on now started only in the 80s. Before that they were not conscious that antiques could have value and sold genuine items for a few bucks. During the culture revolution lots of antiques were simply destroyed. .
Only after China opened up started the faking industry. That does not mean they would not imitate earlier items or styles earlier, but they would not bother (mostly) with faking age signs.
The early fakes were more those of high-value items,like imperial or similar level wares, as those of the 18th century. I don't think they would have much bothered then with faking late Qing or Guangxu minyao items and the corresponding age signs, although they may do so now.

peterp

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #10 on: Jan 30, 2021, 07:51:05 »
Late Qing, possibly Guangxu reign, with typical age/production signs on the glaze and inside the mouth, in my view. Those with the single lion ears are usually a bit shorter than those with two pairs of lions.

Stan, I have seen lots of items, especially this type of late Qing domestic ware, with that type of dirt. I'm pretty sure this is old dirt. Some dealers in the Far East do not clean their items and they may be for years or even decades in storage with lots of other items, sometimes in sheds. Sometimes it is because they simply have too many, but I bet in the west they do not sell them often in this condition with this old dirt on them. Not sure what the orange color is, but as a rule of thumb what can be removed is natural. Fake dirt is usually difficult to remove with scrubbing or the like, because it either it not really dirt, or because it was burned on with heat.

Apart from the bottom we also have to look at the glaze as this is sometimes a good indication of the production/kiln environment of a period. The same is valid for the many glaze indents inside the mouth. I do not think the fakers do imitate these.

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #9 on: Jan 30, 2021, 02:55:13 »
thanks stan

i buy it in the year 1980 ,

cordialy

joseph

Stan

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #8 on: Jan 30, 2021, 02:52:40 »
Much better Photo's, looks like late Qing, however, I have a lot of late Qing vases and none of the bottoms look that dirty, even the orange colour on the edges of the foot looks to me like it might have been added, not natural.

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #7 on: Jan 30, 2021, 01:07:31 »
the others pivs

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #6 on: Jan 30, 2021, 01:05:43 »
hi ,this is pics

haut  33,5 cm
weight 2kg 660 grammes

thanks

joseph

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #5 on: Jan 29, 2021, 03:54:10 »
thanks peterp

tomorow i look and guive you more pics

cordialy

peterp

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #4 on: Jan 28, 2021, 08:08:12 »
Looks right to me from what is show in these pictures. This is a very common item, but there is no picture of the whole vase. The shape is also important. This is not export porcelain. I doubt that a fake would have a lion on the neck. A full picture and a view of the inside of the mouth should show if it is really old. Such vases usually have lots of dark glaze indents inside the mouth. Is there only one lion on each side or two?
Also, the colors are not quite clear. Is there a light greenish celadon glaze with a blue & white decoration on it?
(Cleaning the bottom is usually recommended in order to avoid the impression that the dirt was added artificially.)

Here are two examples of how the bottom may look:
kknews.cc/culture/lk3m8e.html
kknews.cc/culture/2loz9r.html

joseph

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #3 on: Jan 28, 2021, 02:04:53 »
thanks stan

cordialy

joseph

Stan

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Re: chinese identification
« Reply #2 on: Jan 28, 2021, 01:45:26 »
Hi Joseph, I would stay away from vases with bottoms like this, the dirt was added to make it look older than it is, usually the foo lions on the neck would point to mid 19th century but this is clearly much later, not more than a couple decades in my opinion.

joseph

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chinese identification
« Reply #1 on: Jan 28, 2021, 01:14:24 »
hi

some one know , and can say me more

cordialy

joseph